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Software Alchemy

The Art and Science of Software Development

Mapping Entity Types

In this long-overdue entry, we’re going to circle back and discuss the importance of keeping a separation between various entity types within a DDD application, the challenges that presents, and elegant mapping strategies we can use to make it work. First, however, I’m going to briefly touch on some key enhancements to the C# language that were released with version 9, and how those influence our architecture from a Domain-Driven Design perspective. Alongside the blog entry in which I laid out my Clean DDD architectural template in detail, this is one of the most important that I’ve written to date, so I hope you enjoy it and find the knowledge from this to be useful.

Architectural Template

This is an architectural template for building web applications which is based upon my interpretation of the Clean DDD and CQRS concepts that I introduced in the previous entry. To demonstrate this, I've created a demo application which attempts to solve a fictional problem for a fake organization. In developing this template, I studied solutions and tutorials from a handful of experts.

Clean Architecture

In this blog entry I give a primer on Clean Architecture, which is a modern, scalable formal software architecture which is appropriate for modern web applications. Next, I discuss how Domain-Driven Design fits into this picture, and how DDD concepts dovetail nicely into Clean Architecture, producing a methodology called Clean DDD. Finally, I introduce Command Query Responsibility Segregation (CQRS), and describe how it complements and enhances Clean DDD solutions to create software systems that are elegant, robust, scalable, and testable.

Domain Driven Design

What is Domain-Driven Design? It is a software design methodology which seeks to efficiently create business logic components and functionality from business requirements, typically by working closely with domain experts. In this entry, I give a brief overview of Domain-Driven Design (DDD) and discuss its importance in modern software development.

Monoliths/Microservices/Multitenancy

This entry discusses some of the high-level concepts that are relevant to modern software architecture at a general level, namely monoliths vs. microservices, and multitenancy. I'll give some guidance as to what those mean, and how they are applied to this foundational concepts blog series and the accompanying demo application. In this and future blog entries I'll assume that you fall into a certain audience, namely individual entrepreneurs, small software startups, or developers/teams building new solutions within a larger organization. This information is still valuable if you are working on legacy systems or doing what we call brownfield development. However, the spirit of the information presented is most applicable to building new solutions from scratch, what is referred to as greenfield development.